PhosphatePhosphate is a limited resource.(Globally)

The largest phosphorite or rock phosphate deposits in North America lie in the Bone Valley region of central Florida, United States, the Soda Springs region of Idaho, and the coast of North Carolina. Smaller deposits are located in Montana, Tennessee, Georgia and South Carolina near Charleston along Ashley Phosphate road. The small island nation of Nauru and its neighbor Banaba Island, which used to have massive phosphate deposits of the best quality, have been mined excessively. Rock phosphate can also be found in Egypt, Israel, Morocco, Navassa Island, Tunisia, Togo and Jordan, countries that have large phosphate mining industries.

In 2007, at the current rate of consumption, the supply of phosphorus was estimated to run out in 345 years.[4] However, some scientists now believe that a “peak phosphorus” will occur in 30 years and that at “current rates, reserves will be depleted in the next 50 to 100 years.”[5] Reserves refer to the amount assumed recoverable at current market prices, and, in 2012, the USGS estimated 71 billion tons of world reserves, while 0.19 billion tons were mined globally in 2011.[6] Phosphorus comprises 0.1% by mass of the average rock[7] (while, for perspective, its typical concentration in vegetation is 0.03% to 0.2%),[8] and consequently there are quadrillions of tons of phosphorus in Earth’s 3 * 1019 ton crust,[9] albeit at predominantly lower concentration than the deposits counted as reserves from being inventoried and cheaper to extract. Source Wikipedia

Often times our focus is on our natural resources like oil and the current shortages we have. Phosphate is another element which needs more attention with respect to our food supply. Phosphorus is one of 17 essential nutrients for plant development. (Source Ipni.net )Read this article for more information on the importance of phosphate in plants.

Listen to the following presentation and think about how do we make the most effective use of that phosphate. 60-70% of phosphate coming out of the ground is being tied up.

 Picture via Tim Parkinson

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